Tag: "transcript"

Posted December 5, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 384 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher speaks with Matt Larson, owner and CEO of wireless ISP Vistabeam, about his company, the CAF II auction, and rural Internet access. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Matt Larson: These ranchers had actually put the lines up themselves. They had bought the equipment and the wire to put the lines up themselves. So what's really interesting I think is the fact that we're building the service out here and working with these property owners, these ranchers. I think that is interesting deal to be able to show that there's this ability for people in these areas to figure out their own solution.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 384 of the community broadband bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self Reliance . I'm Lisa Gonzalez. You've likely heard the term space cowboy and probably urban cowboy, but this week Christopher talks with Matt Larson, a "wireless cowboy". Matt is owner and CEO of Vistabeam. During this interview, you'll learn that the nickname doesn't come from the garb he wears, but from wrangling Internet access for people in some of the most rural areas in the American West. Vistabeam was awarded subsidies in the connect America funding part two auction and is working to extend their fixed wireless service to more rural communities. Matt who grew up on a ranch knows what it's like to struggle without high quality connectivity and he's made it his life's mission to change that for others living in extremely low population density areas. Matt and Chris talk about the CAF II Auction, the bidding process, and the challenges that Vistabeam has faced as a small company participating in the process. They talk about the new lifeline product that will provide much more affordable and reliable connectivity than the satellite Internet access many locals depend on in the very rural areas. Matt discusses the people they typically serve and why he's not worried that the space X project or places companies services anytime soon. Now, here's Christopher talking with Matt Larson from Vistabeam.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the community broadband bits podcast. I'm Chris...

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Posted November 22, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 383 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher interviews Craig Eccher from Tri-County Rural Electric Cooperative in Pennsylvania about the co-op's new Fiber-to-the-Home build. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Craig Eccher: The whole project itself has made the rural electric co-op relevant again to its membership.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 383 of the Community Boadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. While Christopher was at the Broadband Communities economic development forum in Alexandria, Virginia, last October he interviewed several people for the podcast, including this week's guest, Craig Eccher from the Tri-County Rural Electric Cooperative in Pennsylvania. Craig and Christopher discussed the cooperative's fiber optic project that will bring high quality Internet access to the rural areas within their seven county service area. Located in the north central region of the state and in the Appalachians, large Internet access providers have been hesitant to deploy there due to lack of population density and the challenges in a rugged geography. Craig talks about some of the reasons why the co-op chose to invest in the project, the main impetus being the wishes of cooperative members. He discusses the creative approach they took to find out members' wishes. Christopher and Craig also touch on the co-op's partnerships with established municipal network Chattanooga EPB and with cable companies that serve in the area. There are benefits that go beyond connectivity, and as an electric guy, Craig is sure to point those out. Now here's Craig Eccher from Pennsylvania's Tri-County Rural Electric Cooperative.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. Another live edition — this one also from Alexandria, as we'e here at the Broadband Communities event, talking about economic development. I just pulled Craig Eccher, the president of Tri-County Electric in my home state of Pennsylvania. Welcome to the show.

Craig Eccher: Thanks Chris. Really enjoy being here.

Christopher Mitchell: You were just on a...

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Posted November 14, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 382 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher speaks with Mel Poole from Ocala, Florida, about the growth and evolution of the city's fiber network. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Mel Poole: I think for a city our size to be on the leading edge of technology, I think, is fantastic, and I want us to to be the leader in that innovation, if you will.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 382 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. In October, Christopher attended the Broadband Communities economic development forum in the D.C. area where he had the opportunity to sit down and talk with today's podcast guest, Mel Poole from Ocala, Florida. Years ago, Ocala decided to eliminate leased T1 lines and replace them with city owned fiber. They found that the move has saved millions of dollars and opened doors. That was before Mel's time, but he knows the story and shares it with us, describing how Ocala went from municipal facilities to offering connectivity for county facilities and later to connecting schools, businesses, and residential subscribers. Mel also talks about some of the challenges they've faced, including how demographics affect demand, experimenting with deployment methods to find the best option, and how to make the best use of marketing. Christopher and Mel also talk about some of the economic development stories in Ocala and discuss Mel's vision for the community. Now, here's Christopher with Mel Poole from Ocala, Florida.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast, live edition. This is Chris Mitchell at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm in Alexandria, which I think is in Virginia — nobody flame me for that — at the Broadband Communities economic development event, and I'm talking with Mel Poole, the director of the Ocala fiber network.

Mel Poole: That is correct.

Christopher Mitchell: All right.

Mel Poole: Good morning. How are you?

Christopher Mitchell: The introduction was too long and I started to forget the title...

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Posted November 14, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 2 of the Why NC Broadband Matters bonus series from the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher speaks with Gene Scott, general manager of outside plant for the Greenlight network in Wilson, North Carolina. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Gene Scott: And the door's going to be wide open. It's not going to be just that traditional, "We're going to offer TV and Internet and telephone services over these fiber optic networks." We haven't even imagined all the uses for it yet.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to a special episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast and our new podcast series, Why NC Broadband Matters. I'm Lisa Gonzalez with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance in Minneapolis, Minnesota. NC Broadband Matters is a North Carolina nonprofit. Their mission is to attract, support, and champion the universal availability of affordable, reliable, high capacity Internet access, which is necessary for thriving local communities, local businesses, and a local workforce able to compete in the global economy. The group has created the North Carolina chapter of CLIC, the Coalition for Local Internet Choice. We're collaborating with NC Broadband Matters to present this series that touches on issues that while certainly affect folks in North Carolina also impact people in other states. Our second episode is titled Fiber Rich Wilson: Why and What's Next? You've heard plenty of podcasts from us about communities that have developed Fiber-to-the-Home networks. Have you ever wondered about the actual fiber? In this interview, Christopher talks with Gene Scott, general manager of outside plant from Wilson, North Carolina, where the community has been working with fiber for more than a decade. He talks about Wilson's network — past, present, and future. Now, here's Christopher and Gene to discuss fiber, Wilson, North Carolina, and the Greenlight community broadband network.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast — special series. This is episode two in the Why North Carolina Broadband Matters podcast series, done by me, Christopher Mitchell, at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. And today I'm...

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Posted November 12, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 381 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher speaks with JonT Sallet from the Benton Institute for Broadband and Society about their new report Broadband for America's Future: A Vision for the 2020s. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Jon Sallet: We've tried to offer a vision for debate, for discussion on how to move forward in the next decade.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 381 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. Last week, the Benton Institute for Broadband and Society released a detailed and groundbreaking report titled Broadband for America's Future: A Vision for the 2020s. This week we get to hear author Jon Sallet discuss the publication and the organization's reasons for producing the report as he elaborates on some of his findings. Jon has had a long and illustrious career in Internet policy. He was around when the term information super highway was all the rage and gives us a five minute recap about his work. During the interview, Christopher and Jon cover the four main takeaways in the report along with some special conversation about competition, the term overbuilding, and how encouraging competition could help solve some of the problems we now face. Be sure you download the report and dig deeper into its text, where you're likely to find some familiar stories about local communities and their work on improved connectivity. You can download the report at benton.org/publications/broadband-policy2020s. Before Jon and Christopher get started, however, you'll get to hear a little more about the Benton organization's recent transformation from foundation to institute. Christopher spends a few minutes talking with Adrianne Furniss, Benton's executive director. Adrian explains the evolution of this organization that has been instrumental in our work as well as the work of other broadband advocates. Now, here's Christopher with Adrianne Furniss and also Jon Sallet to talk about the Benton Institute for Broadband and Society and about the institute's recent report.

Christopher Mitchell: I'm sitting here with Adrianne Furniss, the executive...

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Posted November 8, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 380 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher speaks with Derek Turner from Free Press about the broadband deployment data collected by Federal Communications Commission and proposed changes to the filing process. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Derek Turner: We don't succeed if we're operating from a basis of fantasy. We have to operate from a basis of fact, and I think the facts are on our side.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 380 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. The Federal Communications Commission has faced growing criticism in recent years about the accuracy of the data it collects and uses to determine where in America people have access to broadband. In recent months, the FCC announced that they would establish a new approach to collecting the data and asked for input from stakeholders and interested parties. In addition to the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, the nonprofit Free Press submitted comments. Today, Derek Turner from Free Press comes on the show to talk about the problems with the old data collection techniques, the FCC's proposal, and his organization's recommendations. Christopher and Derek talk about the Form 477, which is the instrument that Internet service providers use to report where they offer broadband access. They also discuss why Free Press believes that this form, while not perfect, shouldn't be scrapped as many other commenters have suggested. Derek and Christopher also get into what they expect in the long term from data that is more granular and where challenges may occur. Now here's Christopher with Derek Turner from Free Press.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance up in Minneapolis, talking with Derek Turner, the research director for Free Press. Welcome to the show, Derek.

Derek Turner: Hey, thanks for having me. I'm glad to be here.

Christopher Mitchell: Well, I'm really glad to have you. I feel like you're a person who speaks often through words on the page, and so I'm...

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Posted November 4, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for the first episode of the Why NC Broadband Matters bonus series from the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher speaks with Alan Fitzpatrick of NC Broadband Matters and Open Broadband about network overbuilding and local Internet choice. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Alan Fitzpatrick: Well we'd like to see the state take more positive action on, you know, allowing the use of state assets, county assets, town assets to improve broadband for everyone.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to a special episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast and our new podcast series, Why NC Broadband Matters. I'm Lisa Gonzalez with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance in Minneapolis, Minnesota. NC Broadband Matters is a North Carolina nonprofit. Their mission is to attract support and champion the universal availability of affordable, reliable, high-capacity Internet access necessary for thriving local communities, local businesses, and a local workforce in order to compete in the global economy. The group has created the North Carolina chapter of CLIC, the Coalition for Local Internet Choice. We are collaborating with NC Broadband Matters to present this series that touches on issues that while certainly affect people in North Carolina also impact people in other states. Our first episode is titled "Overbuilding Means Providing Internet Choice: How One Small Company is Closing North Carolina's Digital Divide." Christopher interviews Alan Fitzpatrick from Open Broadband, and they discuss why the word overbuilding should have positive rather than negative connotations. They talk about the need for better connectivity in North Carolina, how the state might play a more meaningful role, and how his company is offering broadband through a range of technical solutions. Now here's Christopher and Alan Fitzpatrick from Open Broadband.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to a special episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance up in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and today kicks off the first of a series of podcasts sponsored by NC Broadband Matters. That's North Carolina Broadband Matters. And to get it all going...

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Posted November 3, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 379 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher interviews writer and reporter Karl Bode about the impact of coporate lobbyists on telecom policy and how the media covers it (or doesn't). Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Karl Bode: Starting locally, fighting locally ⁠— that's where people win. That's where the process hasn't been quite so corrupted over a period of 50 years, you know, so the local fights are super important.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 379 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. There's a limited number of reporters that write about technology and developments in telecommunications and even fewer that keep tabs on related legislation. This week, Christopher sat down with one of the leading writers who has been covering these fields for decades, Karl Bode. Including years contributing to DSL Reports. Karl's work has appeared in Vice, Techdirt, Medium, and a long list of other publications. In this interview, Christopher and Karl discuss how coverage has changed over time and how his focus has changed due to forces in the industry. Karl and Christopher also discussed policy, including events at the FCC surrounding network neutrality, competition and monopolies, and a recent congressional investigation into privacy and social media. Karl has some opinions about what can, should, and might happen and he has years of observation on which to base his ideas. Now, here's Christopher with analyst and writer Karl Bode.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, and I'm in Minneapolis per usual, today talking with Karl Bode, someone who, if you're listening to this show, I'm sure you've run across. He's a long time freelance writer and also a longtime analyst of what happens in the broadband space in particular. Welcome to the show, Karl.

Karl Bode: Hey Chris. Thank you for having me. I appreciate it.

Christopher Mitchell: So let me just ask you if you want to give us a bit of a background because frankly, I've known you...

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Posted October 31, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 378 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher speaks with Denise Linn Riedl, CIO for the city of South Bend, Indiana. They discuss the city's dark fiber network and how they're embracing technology to improve city functions and benefit residents. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Denise Linn Riedl: Technology is not a separate bright and shiny thing. It really is something that we want to be additive to residents and to city government employees.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 378 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. This week, Christopher visits with Denise Linn Riedl, chief innovation officer with the city of South Bend, Indiana. The community owns a dark fiber network that it's using for practical purposes that we don't often hear about in tech news but are nonetheless important for city operations. Denise introduces us to the network and the entities it serves and describes some of the advantages and benefits the asset have brought to South Bend. She talks about their digital inclusion programs and how they've used the network to break through bureaucratic silos. The city is involved in a data governance project, and Denise shares some surprising moments related to innovation surrounding data collection. She explains how the Department of Innovation and Technology has helped other local government departments embrace change management, and she talks about what it's like encouraging people to approach technology differently than they have in the past. Now, here's Christopher with Denise Linn Riedl from South Bend, Indiana.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance up in Minneapolis. Today I'm speaking with Denise Linn Riedl, the chief innovation officer for South Bend, Indiana. Welcome to the show, Denise.

Denise Linn Riedl: Thank you very much for having me, Chris.

Christopher Mitchell: You and I have bumped into each other many times over the years. I'm really excited to get a better sense of what you're up to....

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Posted October 25, 2019 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 377 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher, Lisa, and Jess discuss the misinformation on municipal networks that we've seen recently as well as some old favorites. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Christopher Mitchell: I don't know who's funding the Taxpayer Protection Alliance, but whoever it is, you could do better.

Lisa Gonzalez: Welcome to episode 377 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm Lisa Gonzalez. Every once in awhile we find it necessary to sit down and talk about some of the misinformation about municipal broadband networks that seems to make its way into the media on a pretty regular basis. Typically, local communities that are considering an investment in fiber optic infrastructure to improve connectivity spur a rash of reports, letters to the editor, and other opinion pieces. Those articles and reports are almost always based on poor data and the same old arguments we see again and again. That's why we call these occasional podcasts our crazy talk episodes. In this crazy talk episode, we discuss a couple of articles and reports from the usual cast of characters: the Taxpayers Protection Alliance, the Mackinac Center, and a new report we haven't seen before which uses questionable data. We talk about competition, economic development, and the argument that fiber could become obsolete, and we address other points that anti-muni groups always bring up. For a more comprehensive review of how to address the faulty arguments from these and other groups, take a look at our correcting community fiber fallacies page on muninetworks.org. We're trying to learn more about how communities are using their municipal networks to develop local digital inclusion programs. If you know of any communities doing this, drop us a line at podcast@muninetworks.org. As a reminder, this is digital inclusion week. Check out muninetworks.org or the National Digital Inclusion alliance at digitalinclusion.org. You can learn how you can show your support for digital inclusion. Now, here's Christopher, our communications specialist Jess Del Fiacco, and me for our latest edition of crazy talk.

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