Tag: "transcript"

Posted June 30, 2020 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 416 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. For this episode, Christopher interviews John Bowcut about the municipal broadband network owned by Spanish Fork, Utah. The pair discuss the network's 20-year-long history, upgrading from cable to fiber optics, and Utah's restrictions on community broadband. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

John Bowcut: We have built our success on that sense of community. Everything we do, every time we open our mouth, we hope we talk about that sense of community and what our network contributes to that sense of community.

Jess Del Fiacco: Welcome to episode 416 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. This is Jess Del Fiacco, communications manager here at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.

Jess Del Fiacco: Today, Christopher talks with John Bowcut, director of information systems and network director for Spanish Fork, Utah. Spanish Fork's network is one of the best municipal broadband success stories. It's now 20 years old and more than 80% of community members take at least one service from it. The network is also debt free, and it's been almost completely upgraded from cable to gigabit fiber.

Jess Del Fiacco: Christopher and John discuss how a Utah law stopped a lot of communities from building fiber networks, and they note what a missed opportunity that has been. They also talk about how to market community broadband networks by making them a true community enterprise. Now here's Christopher talking with John Bowcut.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. I'm Christopher Mitchell at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Only I'm still coming from my new office and my home in Saint Paul, Minnesota.

Christopher Mitchell: Today, I'm talking to someone we haven't checked in on too long, but a multiple previous guest, John Bowcut the director of information systems and the Spanish Fork community network director out of Spanish Fork, Utah.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome back to the show, John.

John Bowcut: Thanks so much, Chris. It...

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Posted June 19, 2020 by Katie Kienbaum

This is the transcript for episode 415 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher interviews lawyers Ken Fellman and Geoff Wilson to learn how broadband monopolies got an anti-local authority law passed in Colorado in 2005. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Ken Fellman: We hate this bill. We are local government people, we believe in local control, we believe that local communities ought to be in charge of their own destiny.

Jess Del Fiacco: Welcome to episode 415 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. This is Jess Del Fiacco, Communications Manager here at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. Today Christopher talks with Ken Fellman and Geoff Wilson. They discuss how Qwest, now called CenturyLink, used their influence to get a bill that limits municipal networks adopted in Colorado. At the time, Ken and Geoff did what they could to change the bill to make it less restrictive. They helped to remove the limitations that would have stopped all municipal networks, like what we saw happen in North Carolina. Ken and Geoff also tell Christopher about what has happened in the state since then and how changes, over time, have resulted in the bill being less harmful than it was in the early years. Now, here's Christopher talking with Ken Fellman and Geoff Wilson.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. I'm Christopher Mitchell with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, which is located in Minneapolis, as well as several other cities. I'm coming to you from Saint Paul, Minnesota today. And I'm going to speak with Ken Fellman, a partner with the Denver law firm, Kissinger & Fellman. Ken's been representing local government in Colorado and throughout the country for over 35 years. Welcome to the show, Ken.

Ken Fellman: Thank you.

Christopher Mitchell: And I'm also welcoming Geoff Wilson, who is a special counsel at Murray Dahl Beery & Renaud, and who has worked at the Colorado Municipal League on these issues, where he was the general counsel. Welcome to the show, Geoff.

Geoff Wilson: Thank you. Pleased to be here.

Christopher Mitchell:...

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Posted June 10, 2020 by shrestha

This is the transcript for episode 414 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher talks to Scott Rasmussen, an organizer with the nonprofit, volunteer-run community network NYC Mesh about why NYC Mesh is a good model to serve low income people in NYC. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Scott Rasmussen: I think at a fundamental level it's about community control, community self determination, and our ability to own our own means of communication.

Jess Del Fiacco: Welcome to Episode 414 at the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. This is Jess Del Fiacco, communications manager here at the Institute for Local Self Reliance. Today, Christopher talks with Scott Rasmussen of NYC Mesh. NYC Mesh is a volunteer driven, high quality, wireless network that stretches across three boroughs of New York City. Scott explains that much of New York doesn't have a good Internet access and talks about why NYC Mesh is a good model for expanding Internet access to low income populations. Scott also notes how excited people are to finally have an affordable community option and how inspired people get about these issues when they realize they can build their own network. Now, here's Christopher talking with Scott Rasmussen of NYC Mesh.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. I'm Chris Mitchell with the Institute for Local Self Reliance and I'm here talking with Scott Rasmussen, an organizer with NYC Mesh. Welcome to the show, Scott.

Scott Rasmussen: Thanks so much for having me, Chris.

Christopher Mitchell: I'm excited to learn more about what's going on in New York City with this Mesh project, but the first thing I wanted to ask you is, you're an interesting guy, you got a lot of opportunities to do different things, why are you such a fan of breathable fabric?

Scott Rasmussen: It dates back to my early work in the fashion industry and it really took off from there. No, my interest in NYC Mesh really, I think stems from years of working on Capitol Hill. I worked for five years doing telecommunications policy as an advisor to members of Congress, and really...

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Posted June 7, 2020 by shrestha

This is the transcript for episode 413 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher talks to Tanna Greathouse, a local resident in Boone, North Carolina who is operating an online business from home. Tanna shares her frustration with unreliable, expensive, and poor Internet connectivity in her community and how it has negatively affected her work productivity during the pandemic. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

Tanna Greathouse: The ability to telework, to do this all remotely, I think, is a huge epiphany for our entire country really. For any business owners, there's a lot of money that could be saved in a very uncertain environment.

Jess Del Fiacco: Welcome to episode 413 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. This is Jess Del Fiacco, Communications Manager here at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. Today, Christopher talks to Tanna Greathouse, a Boone North Carolina resident, who operates an online business from home that helps entrepreneurs streamline their work by taking care of administrative tasks. A lack of connectivity options in the area means that Tanna has to sign up for three overlapping services, paying over $300 a month for unreliable slow and high latency Internet connections.

Jess Del Fiacco: Tanna and Chris talk about the struggle to perform even basic cloud-based productivity work and how this struggle has been amplified by the coronavirus pandemic, which has seen business grow, but connectivity problems get worse. They talk about what things might look like if there were more local Internet choice and how the rise of telework will likely change how large and small businesses operate in the future. Now here's Christopher talking with Tanna Greathouse.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. I'm Christopher Mitchell at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. I'm here talking to Tanna Greathouse, who is just outside Boone, North Carolina, and runs her company, Your Favorite Assistant. And Tanna reached out to us because of real struggles using the Internet access that is available in that part. So Tanna, welcome to the show.

Tanna Greathouse: Hi, thanks for...

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Posted June 2, 2020 by shrestha

This is the transcript for episode 8 of our special podcast series, "Why NC Broadband Matters," on the Community Broadband Bits podcast. This episode is a continuation of a conversation between Chris, Catharine, and Jack about the history of North Carolina's HB 129. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

Jack Cozort: We gave the big cable companies ten years under House Bill 129. They promised that they were going to put fiber out in these communities, and they haven't done it. And so we need to be asking all of our candidates for the legislature, "Are you going to stand up to those cable companies? And are you going to allow local government the options it needs to bring Internet to people who need it?"

Jess Del Fiacco: We're bringing you another episode in our special Community Broadband Bits Podcast series, Why NC Broadband Matters. I'm Jess Del Fiacco with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance in Minneapolis, Minnesota. NC Broadband Matters is a North Carolina nonprofit. Their mission is to attract, support, and champion the universal availability of affordable, reliable, high-capacity Internet access. The group has created the North Carolina Chapter of CLIC, the Coalition for Local Internet Choice. ILSR is working with NC Broadband Matters to produce this series focusing on issues affecting people in North Carolina that also impact folks in other regions. We're joined today by Catharine Rice, the project manager for the Coalition for Local Internet Choice, and co-founder of NC Broadband Matters. As well as Jack Cozort, a government relations consultant who is involved with broadband in the North Carolina state legislature.

Jess Del Fiacco: This episode is part two of a conversation about the history of North Carolina's HB 129. The law that preempted local telecommunications authority in the state. Reflecting on their first-hand experience, Catharine and Jack tell Christopher about the unfair games that cable companies play to prevent local governments in North Carolina from being able to invest in broadband networks. Now here's Christopher talking with...

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Posted June 2, 2020 by shrestha

This is the transcript for episode 412 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher talks with Catharine Rice, Project Manager for The Coalition for Local Internet Choice, and Co-Founder of NC Broadband Matters. He is also joined by Jack Cozort, a government relations consultant. Chris, Jack, and Catharine talk about the history of North Carolina's HB 129, the anti-competition law that restricted local authorities from deploying broadband in their communities. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

 

Catharine Rice: I remember Jim Baller saying, "Catharine." I said, "Jim, I don't know how to be a lobbyist," and he's like, "Time to learn."

Jess Del Fiacco: Welcome to episode 412 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast, another installment of our series focused on North Carolina, sponsored by NC Broadband Matters. This is Jess Del Fiacco, Communications Manager here at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. Today, Christopher is joined by Catharine Rice, Project Manager for The Coalition for Local Internet Choice, and Co-Founder of NC Broadband Matters. He's also joined by Jack Cozort, a government relations consultant who's involved with broadband and the North Carolina State Legislature. This is part one of a conversation about the history of North Carolina's HB 129, the law that preempted local telecommunications authority in the state. Chris, Jack and Catharine begin by discussing what the economic situation was in Wilson North Carolina in the years prior to the adoption of HB 129.

Jess Del Fiacco: In particular, how local leaders were working to take the community into the future with infrastructure investments. After attempting to work with the large incumbent providers, the city decided to invest in a broadband network on their own. They then faced pushback from Time Warner Cable, which wanted to put an end to Wilson's network and prevent other communities from having the ability to develop their own networks. Jack and Catharine describe the experience of being involved in the process as lobbyists and large corporate entities pushed misinformation in order to pass legislation to prevent competition.

Jess Del Fiacco: Don't miss the second...

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Posted May 27, 2020 by shrestha

This is the transcript for episode 411 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher talks with Steven Bandy from OzarksGo at Ozarks Electric Cooperative about bringing Fiber-to-the-Schoolbus to get students and families connected during the pandemic. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

Steven Bandy: One of my employees reached out and said, "Hey, is there something we could possibly do here?" And I said, "Yeah." He started reaching out and got ahold of the superintendent. And the next thing we knew, we were out there hand digging in lines to school buses and building mobile hotspots for the school district.

Jess Del Fiacco: Welcome to episode 411 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. This is Jess Del Fiacco, Communications Manager here at the Institute for Local Self Reliance. Today, Christopher is joined by Steven Bandy General Manager of OzarksGo at Ozarks Electric Cooperative, one of the largest cooperatives in the United States. Steven gives us a short history of how the co-op first got into the broadband business and how they've been growing and managing the increased demand for fiber optic networks since then. Steven also talks about new challenges introduced by the pandemic and how OzarksGo is working to serve their local community during this difficult time. They found ways to work with community partners to build mobile hotspots for local school districts, enabling students to get their homework done well outside of the classroom. Here's Christopher talking with Steven Bandy, General Manager of OzarksGo.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. I'm Christopher Mitchell at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Today I'm talking to Steve Bandy, the General Manager of OzarksGo at Ozarks Electric Cooperative. Welcome to the show.

Steven Bandy: How are you doing today, Chris?

Christopher Mitchell: I'm doing well. And it's great to talk to you. We've been tracking your progress quietly from afar and are enthusiastic about your fiber network. So I'm looking to learn more about that. I guess the first thing I'd just like to get a sense...

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Posted May 21, 2020 by shrestha

This is the transcript for episode 410 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. This episode features Heather "Mo" Williams, Manager of Solutions Engineering at Ruckus Networks, Wi-Fi engineer for Black Hat conferences, and co-host on the podcast This Week in Enterprise Tech.  Listen to the episode to learn all things Wi-Fi, or read the transcript below.

 

Heather "Mo" Williams: I like to describe Wi-Fi, the protocol for it is 802.11. It is the most Southern of protocols because it's polite.

Jess Del Fiacco: Welcome to episode 410 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. This is Jess Del Fiacco, Communications Manager here at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. In today's episode, Christopher talks with Heather Williams, also known as Mo of Ruckus Networks and the show This Week in Tech at the TWiET Network. Heather starts off by talking a little bit about her work and the history of Ruckus Networks. Then she and Christopher discuss all things Wi-Fi, its unique characteristics, how it's evolved over time, and how the recent FCC decision to open up more spectrum is affecting the ability to provide Wi-Fi. Here's Christopher talking with Heather Williams of Ruckus Networks.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. I'm Christopher Mitchell at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance in my St. Paul office in my home. I'm here talking to Heather Williams, who's more commonly known by Mo, who is a manager of a solutions engineering group at Ruckus Networks, which is now a CommScope company. Welcome to the show, Heather.

Heather "Mo" Williams: Hey, thanks for having me.

Christopher Mitchell: I already forgot. I should've called you Mo.

Heather "Mo" Williams: It's all right. I have four kids, I answered to anything.

Christopher Mitchell: I'm sure they respect you enough that it's not anything.

Heather "Mo" Williams: I don't know about that either. I was a pretty snarky mom. I'm going to have to take what I dished out...

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Posted May 11, 2020 by shrestha

This is the transcript for episode 409 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode Christopher speaks with Ernesto Falcon, Senior Legislative Counsel at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) about EFF's history, it's involvement in repealing California's municipal broadband preemption, and California advanced services fund program. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

Ernesto Falcon: My hope is we can get SB 1130 done this year on an expedited basis, free up the agency to really remedy these harms, and as well as free up the capacity of local governments that are kind of in a war room footing right now to explore their options to build out their own networks.

Jess Del Fiacco: Welcome to episode 409 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. This is Jess Del Fiacco, Communications Manager here at the Institute for Local Self Reliance. In today's episode, Christopher talks with Ernesto Falcon, Senior Legislative Counsel at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Ernesto gives Christopher a brief history of the organization and the two discussed the Electronic Frontier Foundation's involvement in repealing California's municipal broadband preemption. Ernesto also talks about the California advanced services fund program, why so many people have been left without internet access during the pandemic, and what the future of connectivity looks like. Here's Christopher talking with Ernesto Falcon, of the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. This is Christopher Mitchell from the Institute for Local Self Reliance in Saint Paul, Minnesota, talking with someone who's a bit warmer, a bit sunnier, Ernesto Falcon, welcome to the show.

Ernesto Falcon: Hey, thanks for having me.

Christopher Mitchell: So Ernesto, you're not only in the California area, you just have a very bright disposition, I've noticed over the years. You are the senior legislative counsel for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which most people know is EFF. Just a little bit of background. What's EFF?

Ernesto Falcon: Yeah, so the Electronic Frontier Foundation, we're a nonprofit public...

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Posted May 8, 2020 by shrestha

This is the transcript for episode 408 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. This episode is a two part show where Christopher talks with community advocates Glen Akins and Colin Garfield as well as Colman Keane, Connexion's executive director, and Erin Shanley, Connexion marketing manager. They discuss about Fort Collins, Colorado's municipal broadband network — Connexion. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.

 

Glen Akins: When you get deep into one of these neighborhoods in Fort Collins and you pull a piece of conduit out, you're a hero.

Jess Del Fiacco: Welcome to episode 408 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. This is Jess Del Fiacco, Communications Manager here at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. We have a two part show today focused on Fort Collins, Colorado's municipal broadband network, called Connexion. In the first half of this episode, Christopher talks with Colin Garfield and Glen Akins who helped organize a campaign that pushed for municipal broadband in Fort Collins. In the second half of the show, Christopher is joined by Erin Shanley and Colman Keane of Connexion. Colin and Glen tell Christopher about their efforts to build public support for municipal broadband in Fort Collins. While there were existing broadband providers in the city, residents believed in the value of competition and the need to invest in future proofing infrastructure. They voted to allow the city to build the network in 2017. Colin who is already receiving service from Connexion talk a little bit about the installation process and how the city is working to make that process as smooth as possible as they continue expanding the network. Colin and Glen also discuss how Comcast and CenturyLink are responding to the new competition and the community's enthusiasm for the network. Now, here's Christopher talking with Glen Akins and Colin Garfield from Fort Collins, Colorado. Stay tuned for his following conversation with Erin Shanley and Colman Keane.

Christopher Mitchell: Welcome to another episode of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. This is Christopher Mitchell at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance in Saint Paul, Minnesota talking with two of my favorite people from Fort Collins. We've got Glen...

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