WOW! No Wonder Time Warner Cable is Pushing Bill to Limit Competition in NC!

Stacey Higginbotham at GigaOm has explained the entire reason Time Warner Cable and CenturyLink are trying to prohibit communities from building their own networks: North Carolina has some of the worst broadband in America! TWC and CenturyLink know how uncompetitive their services are! The story covers a new broadband map launched by bandwidth.com.

nc-bbchart.png

Look at these numbers!!

North Carolina has SEVEN of the worst 10 places to get broadband in the US. And these are the places in North Carolina that actually have broadband! Imagine how bad it is in the rural areas. Stunning to see the North Carolina Legislators conspiring to limit the ability of communities to invest in themselves when the private sector has no interest in next-generation networks, choosing instead to reap profits off of systems that barely meet the FCC's definition of broadband.

With such terribly uncompetitive services, of course Time Warner Cable and CenturyLink have run to the Legislature to ban the community networks that have stepped in to prevent lazy incumbents from killing the future of entire communities in the digital age. As we have been detailing (most recently here), the public is overwhelmingly opposed to Raleigh telling communities they cannot build the networks TWC and CenturyLink will not.

What more proof is necessary that the Legislators pushing H129 in North Carolina have sold out the citizens for a few massive companies that just happen to make large donations to their campaigns.

We previously charted the superiority of the community fiber networks in North Carolina, but this chart shows just how much the existing cable and DSL companies have left North Carolina communities behind.

Video: 
See video

Comments

Doesn't seem to match reality...

There's something very wrong with these numbers. They cite NetIndex as their source of data. Yet when you go to NetIndex and look at what they calculate as the cost per MBPS, you get a very different set of numbers. Here's the link: http://www.netindex.com/value/3,62/North-Carolina,-US/

I was really skeptical about this as I live outside of Charlotte and get my internet from TWC in Charlotte. By the methodology that they indicate, I pay about $7.95 per Mbps, quite a bit lower than the listed Charlotte average of $52.73 per Mbps.

Matching Reality

If you read the GigaOm piece, you'll see what they are measuring -- connections for small/medium business types.  Dedicated access, most likely, not some over-subscribed pipe from TWC.